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17. Promenade Check
Fact Sheet
Official Name:Promenade Check
Dance / Level:Full Bronze American Style Foxtrot
Aliases:Promenade Chair
Suggested
Prerequisites:
None

The Promenade Check is a figure where the second walk in promenade position is checked, or stopped. This is especially useful as a tool to maneuver when space is limited or traffic interrupts a couple when in promenade position. It is danced to the same SSQQ timing as basic Promenade, but instead of following through into a chasse down the line of dance, the man and lady replace weight to the back foot and then close their feet on the "quick, quick" counts.

Since a check is a stopping action for the purpose of changing direction, all exits to the Promenade Check involve the replacing of weight to the back foot (man's left foot, lady's right) in fallaway position. There are several other variations of the exit in this direction, but the most basic (and the only one allowed in competitions at the bronze level) is the one shown here, with man and lady simpy replacing weight to the back foot and closing.

Twinkles are also a popular entry into the Promenade Check, as is any figure that finishes (or can be finished) in promenade position. The basic Forward Twinkle, the Back Twinkle, and even the Twinkle from counter-promenade to promenade position can serve as en entry. When used as an entry, Twinkle figures are danced in lieu of the first promenade walk, and so are followed by steps 2-4 of the Promenade Check. The timing of the Twinkle is then "slow, quick quick", with steps 2-4 of the Promenade Check also being taken as "slow, quick quick".

When taken with a longer step on flexed knees and upper bodies stretched upward and slightly away, the more stylized position -- and resulting figure -- are sometimes referred to as a "Chair". It should be noted, however, that the Chair is generally considered to be a more advanced figure, and is not allowed at the bronze level in most dance competitions. So this type of shaping should be avoided, and the length of the step and depth of the knee flexing should be kept to a minimum in bronze level competitions.

17b. Promenade Check to Back Basic

To follow the Promenade Check with a Back Basic, a special type of action known as a "slip pivot" is required. The particular brand of slip pivot needed to transition from fallaway position after the check to the outside partner position of the Back Basic is lesser in both amount and difficulty, and thus makes for a very good stepping stone as the student builds the skills needed to execute more advanced slip pivot actions in later levels.

Following the check, as the lady replaces weight back to her right foot, the man will begin to lead her to turn to her left, in order to "slip" back to closed position. He does not turn through his feet, but he leads the lady to turn by turning his upper body slightly leftward, nearly squaring off to his feet. By the time the next step is taken -- man right foot side & slightly back, lady side & slightly forward -- she will have turned 1/4 to left to end in closed position, preparing to step outside partner. These two steps are taken to the counts "quick quick". This is followed by a Back Basic, with the first step being taken by lady outside partner on the man's right side.

The Back Basic itself can be taken without turn, or with up to 3/8 turn to left over the last 3 steps. It is most common to turn 1/4, the figure ended with man facing diagonal center (or diagonal wall of new line of dance, if taken at a corner).

**Competition dancers please note: Slip pivots are considered by most dance organizations to be an advanced action, and are not allowed in competition events at the bronze level. Although this is an extremely useful figure, both functionally for the sake of floorcraft and pedagogically, it should not be incorporated into your competition repertoire untless you enter the silver or above levels.

17c. Promenade Check & Slip Pivot

A full slip pivot is one where the man leads the lady to "slip" into a closed in-line position from fallaway, with both man and lady executing a reverse pivot on the last step.

Beginning with the check, the man leads the lady to "slip" to closed position as she replaces her weight to her right foot. Since he has no turn through the feet, he leads her to turn by turning his upper body slightly to the left, squaring off to his feet. The next step is back on right foot in CBMP for man, left foot forward in CBMP for lady, pivoting on the foot. The amount of turn on the pivot can be anywhere from 1/8 to 1/2 to left. The timing of the two steps is "quick quick".

The normal amount of turn on the pivot is 1/4, because it takes the couple from a promenade that moves along line of dance with man facing diagonal wall, to closed position with man facing diagonal center. More turn is less likely to be used at the side of the room, since it sets the couple against the flow of traffic. But more turn could be used at a corner.

**Competition dancers please note: Slip pivots are considered by most dance organizations to be an advanced action, and are not allowed in competition events at the bronze level. Although this is an extremely useful figure, both functionally for the sake of floorcraft and pedagogically, it should not be incorporated into your competition repertoire untless you enter the silver or above levels.

 

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