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Spin Sway
Posted by quickstep
5/15/2007  7:10:00 PM
Jonathan. Is there any Sway in a Spin in the Standard style of dancing. Would a Sway take a couple off balance.
Re: Spin Sway
Posted by anymouse
5/15/2007  8:34:00 PM
"Is there any Sway in a Spin in the Standard style of dancing."

Not in the basic version, but yes, it plays an important role in many of the more advanced interpretations being performed to great effect by leading competitors.

"Would a Sway take a couple off balance."

Almost any movement in dance technically takes a couple off balance. The more important question is, would it disrupt their poise, or their SENSE of balance. And the answer to that is NO, not if it is properly coordinated with their movement.
Re: Spin Sway
Posted by Waltz123
5/15/2007  8:36:00 PM
The basic Spin Turn doesn't have any, but there's nothing that would prevent you from being able to add sway to Spins & Pivots. We do it all the time, in various combinations. I just don't recommend it for your next exam, if you know what I'm saying.

Jonathan
Re: Spin Sway
Posted by Anonymous
5/25/2007  5:19:00 AM
Is this right: I can dance a sway in a Spin turn to right and left? Right sway when rising on step 5 (Natural Spin Turn)?
Re: Spin Sway
Posted by Waltz123
5/26/2007  10:56:00 PM
There is a version of pivots with man's leftward (lady's rightward) sway, usually with a promenade shape. Common entries are (1) Inverted Tipple Chasse (man forward, lady back), or (2) the Outside Spin variation where the man sways to L on 2 and opens the lady to a promenade shape.

The Running Spin Turn is also often accompanied by leftward sway on steps 3-4. The sway actually begins to kick in slightly earlier, between steps 2-3.

As for a pivoting type of action with rightward sway, you may have heard of something called a Lunge Roll. It's probably most common in Tango (preceding the Stop Lock), but versions exist in Waltz, Foxtrot and Quickstep, too. Technically it's not a rightward sway that's held throughout the entire turn; You generally transfer weight to the RF (LF for lady), then commence sway. And mind you, this is not just any normal sway, a good lady will really lay this one out (hence the "Lunge"), pivoting all the while.

And here's another one: The Overturned Spin Turn to Turning Lock to R. It's not just a spin with straight rightward sway, however. Like the Lunge Roll, the sway starts kicking in mid-movement. Think of it as a smooth Lunge Roll with rise... The body is straight as you approach the RF, then sway begins once the weight begins transferring, and continues to increase as you move away from it and towards the next step. The rightward sway is then held through the beginning of the Turning Lock, straightening out between steps 2 & 3.

Regards,
Jonathan
Re: Spin Sway
Posted by anymouse
5/27/2007  8:40:00 AM
"And here's another one: The Overturned Spin Turn to Turning Lock to R. It's not just a spin with straight rightward sway, however. Like the Lunge Roll, the sway starts kicking in mid-movement. Think of it as a smooth Lunge Roll with rise... The body is straight as you approach the RF, then sway begins once the weight begins transferring, and continues to increase as you move away from it and towards the next step. The rightward sway is then held through the beginning of the Turning Lock, straightening out between steps 2 & 3."

Yes. And this plays an important role in linearizing the movement of the spin turn and turning lock, giving the overall grouping three clear line segments: The DW movement of the natural, the LOD movement of the spin turn and turning lock, and finally the DC movement of the promenade. If instead, the spin were interpreted as a sort of vertical pivot and then toe pivot, you'd tend to get the look of the partners going in circles round each other there, and loosing the clear sense of progression down the floor.
Re: Spin Sway
Posted by Anna
5/27/2007  4:27:00 PM
Do we Sway on a Spin. Is the actuall Spin a progresive step or is it stationary. We step into a Double Reverse Spin and we step out of a Double Reverse Spin. Do we Sway or move as the feet come together. not if you are dancing with me you dont. Pivots can have Sway and movement Spin i think not.
My comment on a Turning Lock after a Overturned Spin Turn. If as a man you sway to the right. Have you given any thought to the ladies steps throughout this barbaric action. They would have to Sway to the left. If you want to turn an established group into something it is not then don't call it a Turning Lock which should finish in promenade position diagnal to the centre for an entry into a Running Weave.
If there was any hint of a Sway on the Turning Lock it would be the other way around and not to the man's right..
Re: Spin Sway
Posted by Waltz123
5/27/2007  8:52:00 PM
Is the actuall Spin a progresive step or is it stationary.
Most rotation in closed position ballroom dancing is progressive. But progressive rotation doesn't necessarily preclude any other range of motion. There are only two things you can't do during progressive rotation: Stop moving, and stop turning. (Well, technically you can, but then it's no longer progressive rotation.

Ballroom dancing is entirely about moving through three basic ranges of motion (progression, rotation and swing/sway) in various combinations and speeds. At any given time you can have one, two, or all three. To say that only two can exist at once is silly.

Pivots can have Sway and movement Spin i think not.
The ultimate show of arrogance is to declare that just because you are incapable of doing something, it means it can't be done.

That's not to say that you should necessarily try it. Perhaps it's not for you. Pivot & Spin actions do not require sway; It is simply an option, and not one that you ever have to explore... especially if you lack the skill to pull it off.

Nonetheless, good dancers do it all the time, and they somehow manage to execute it with extreme grace and elegance. "Barbaric" is a reasonable word to describe what happens when an under-qualified dancer attempts it, but the same could be said of any movement. Even the most basic bronze sway-less Spin Turn can look "barbaric" if attempted by a beginner who is not familiar with the basic technique.

If you want to turn an established group into something it is not then don't call it a Turning Lock which should finish in promenade position diagnal to the centre for an entry into a Running Weave.
You certainly like to limit yourself. Then again, that may be exactly what you need to do at this point in your dancing, so it's not necessarily a bad thing. Just remember that not everybody requires such limitations as your own.

Turning locks can sway to the left OR right, can be ended in closed OR promenade position, and can be followed by just about anything. If you're into the whole 1994 thing, yes, a Running Weave or Quick Open Reverse to Tumble Turn is a lovely pattern to follow with. Tried and true. But it doesn't need to be followed by anything to be called a Turning Lock. The defining qualities are not what comes before or after, but what it is: A lock step that turns.

Regards,
Jonathan
Re: Spin Sway
Posted by Anna
5/28/2007  8:21:00 PM
The main point of this discusion is the Turning Lock following an Overturned Spin Turn to back the LOD. Not the one that follows a Spin Turn backing diagnal to the centre which we all know does not have Sway to the right. I might add that ordinary Lock Steps Quickstep or Waltz plus an Outside Spin has no Sway at all. Neither does a Double Reverse Spin. So who teaches a Sway to the right for a man on a Turning Lock backing LOD. It is not a Tipple Chasse which would Sway left anyway. It is interesting but the Turning Lock it is a deep cross and not the half hearted one we so often see. Main point. There should be no Sway to the right for a man on a Turning Lock that has an alignment of backing LOD. So i am told. This is the Internation Style of Ballroom Dancing. For the other styles i haven't a clue.
Re: Spin Sway
Posted by phil.samways
5/29/2007  2:44:00 AM
Hi Anna
It's interesting because we do a spin turn, back turning lock (backing LOD) opening out to promenade.
I've been told that 'no sway' is the English style. Correct and nice if done properly. Sway to the right is the 'italian' style. More volume, harder to do well, but more interesting.
We do the sway to the right version. I find it brings my body round, helping my partner move round me smoothly, and there is an 'over-the-top' feeling about opening in promenade, which is nice.
I have a habit of collapsing a bit to the right, instead of projecting myself up and out to sway. But i know about it, and i'm working on it.

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