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Feather Timing
Posted by Ivan
7/24/2007  7:40:00 PM
Jonathan, i made a note of something written 2.10. 07. You wrote . And who teaches that a quick which is followed by a slow delays its placement of by half a beat of the slow. And goes on to say. But just about everybody in the competetive world dating back at least 10 to 15 year do. I can point out four Professionals who don't or didn't in the 06 Foxtrot Blackpool final. Howson. Hawkins. Crossly and Gozzoli. For my money they are right on the beat.
I think i can see where the mutations occured. At the end of the fourth beat which is the second quick, we rotate into a neutral position, some call it a balance position, on the count of four and. as we are aware the and comes from the beat we are on and not the beat that has not yet arrived yet. I also have the Blackpool tape on which Pat Thompson critisised Allen for not arriving on the second quick with the beat.. Like all mutations they never last.. what other ways are there. One is to rotate as we arrive . Or not to rotate at all and keep the left side leading, Another mutation which didn't last. Very recently, last week i attended a lecture where it was said that for the Foxtrot S Q Q S has been since before 1914 and the Rumba 2 3 4 1. It will never alter. If anybody wishes to travell the world and teach differently they should first write a book and see if they can sell it.
Re: Feather Timing
Posted by anymouse
7/25/2007  8:56:00 AM
"Jonathan, i made a note of something written 2.10. 07. You wrote . And who teaches that a quick which is followed by a slow delays its placement of by half a beat of the slow. And goes on to say. But just about everybody in the competetive world dating back at least 10 to 15 year do. I can point out four Professionals who don't or didn't in the 06 Foxtrot Blackpool final. Howson. Hawkins. Crossly and Gozzoli. For"

Measure the actual interval between their quicks on that video and you will find that it's at least a beat and a half. Which is to say that they are in fact doing precisly what was described here, drawing out the final quick at least an extra half beat.

For example, on Howson at the beginning, the duration from the placement of his step 2 to step 3 is 20 frames, yet there are only 12 or 13 frames per beat on that video.

Find a tape of Andrew Sinkinson and the inteval will be a beat and three quarters!

Needless to say, in that situation only one of the two quicks can be anywhere near a beat.

Re: Feather Timing
Posted by Serendipidy
7/25/2007  10:51:00 PM
Not quite sure i am with this one in understanding. Measure the actual interval between their quicks and will find it is at the least a beat and a half. Do you mean a quick is 1.1/2 a beats. If that is the case Then its not a quick. How would i measure a blink of an eyelid. I doubt if it is possible to blink twice on one beat of music. I think i am with the person who asked Jonathan to answer that on that Blackpool video a quick is a quick and a slow is a slow. If i can find it , I have Andrew giving his retirement dance. I can recall he danced to some incredibly slow Tempo 24 bars a minute in the Foxtrot. Thats 96 beats a minute in your language instead of about 120. Correct me if i am wrong . At a 120 BPM that = two beats every one second. It begins to look a bit stupid when its put like that taking into consideration i cant blink that fast. I know. You've got electronic timing like at a foot race.
Re: Feather Timing
Posted by Doug
7/26/2007  6:23:00 AM
Anymouse,if Howsons second quick is one&half beats that would make his timeng SQS,as for Silkensons Timing: I have a vidio of the 1992 Blackpool Championship that I have danced along with and I can tell you that 2cd quick comes up very fast,just try and you will know it is close to one beat. Where I think you may be going wrong with the frames is that you are measuring the size of the steps and not the timeing. Silkinson has a strong compression from his left knee and ball of foot that give a long stride(flight). Cheers
Re: Feather Timing
Posted by anymouse
7/26/2007  6:41:00 AM
Serendipity:

"Do you mean a quick is 1.1/2 a beats."

Indeed, a quick in foxtrot which will be followed by a slow is actually executed as an interval of at least 1 and 1/2 beats between its placement and the placement of the previous step. That's simply how the dance is done by everyone who understands it.

"If i can find it , I have Andrew giving his retirement dance. I can recall he danced to some incredibly slow Tempo 24 bars a minute in the Foxtrot."

And no doubt still made his final quicks at least a beat and a half. At normal tempo, he habitually made them a beat and three quarters!

Doug:

"Anymouse,if Howsons second quick is one&half beats that would make his timeng SQS,as for Silkensons Timing"

Howsons timing like everyone else's is related to Sinkinson's, however most dancers like Howson can only stretch out that final quick a little over a beat and a half. Sinkinson routinely made it a beat and three quarters.

But none of them are dancing SQS. A description in slows and quicks is unable to accurately describe the literal reality of how it is actually done. Instead, we use the traditional notation - SQQ - to describe the overall amount of time in the figure, and trust that all experienced dancers will execute the usual drifted timing and action for such a figure; it is only beginners who fall into the trap of trying to literally execute SQQ as 2:1:1.

"Where I think you may be going wrong with the frames is that you are measuring the size of the steps and not the timeing."

No, I am in fact measuring a time interval and not a distance.
Re: Feather Timing
Posted by Administrator
7/27/2007  12:38:00 AM
As per reasons described previously, this is a BANNED TOPIC.

DO NOT post additional replies to this topic. They will be deleted, and you will be banned from using the message board.

Jonathan
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