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Re: Abbreviation query
Posted by terence2
9/11/2008  12:09:00 AM
Let me add a word of caution about the terminology.
Much of it may have more complex meaning than is implied by the printed word. CBMP is one.

May I suggest that you seek an expert
opinion on its practical application.
Re: Abbreviation query
Posted by anymouse
9/11/2008  9:19:00 AM
"BUT could you please tell me what CBMP stands for as it is in both the Quick Step and Fox Trot "Right foot forward in CBMP" and although it is probably so simple (and I've looked at the abbreviations list without success) I would be very pleased if you could let me know what this stands for."

Leaving aside the literal meaning, the practical implication of the term is that when you take these steps, which are generally the ones outside partner, your moving leg will need to swing diagonally across your body as it moves.

We call the position where it lands somewhat to the other side of the body "contra body movement position".
Re: Abbreviation query
Posted by terence2
9/11/2008  10:03:00 AM
You see.. this is why these types of responses can be very dangerous to the
beginning student.
Re: Abbreviation query
Posted by Telemark
9/12/2008  10:36:00 AM
You can't make sense of CBMP until you have got the hang of CBM, because CBMP is:

"The placing of the stepping foot, forward or back, onto or across the line of the other foot, giving the appearance of CBM having been used, but without turning the body."

This ought to be obvious enough, but CBMP is regularly used at the same time as CBM (which might appear to be a contradiction in terms, but isn't), and you need a good teacher to demonstrate and explain what is going on, and much more importantly, why.
Re: Learn the basics first
Posted by Ladydance
9/11/2008  11:11:00 AM
Hi Esme,
My advice is to not worry about CBM or CBMP just yet. Just learn your basic steps. Once you have them down pat and can do them without thinking, then you can start working on technique. You and your husband have to get the hang of following and leading, no small feat, I assure you. Dancing is meant to be fun, not an exercise in frustration.
Re: Learn the basics first
Posted by Telemark
9/12/2008  1:22:00 PM
This is good advice. Your teacher will introduce these important technique concepts when you are ready to benefit from their application. Be aware of CBMP, by all means, but don't worry about it. CBM, particularly, will naturally develop as you attain the ability to move freely, and you learn to let your body movement determine where you are going, rather than be moved by your feet (it might sound unlikely to an inexperienced dancer, but one of the key reasons we move our feet at all while we dance, is simply that we would fall over if we didn't).

One of the easiest figures in which to see CBMP at work is a chasse from promenade position following a whisk (waltz). Both man and lady are facing each other, and yet both step forward (and across) in CBMP, but don't collide. This is CBMP (and, of course, promenade position) at work. There are lots of basic dance movements/actions which have to be learned; but once you have started to develop as a dancer, you come to realise that you have quietly assimilated them without effort, or even being aware of what is happening.

Find a good teacher. Be guided by their experience and your constant practice.
Re: Abbreviation query
Posted by anymouse
9/11/2008  2:38:00 PM
"You can't make sense of CBMP until you have got the hang of CBM, because CBMP is"

I would strongly disagree.

You need to understand both to understand the derivation of the terms and why they are linked in naming but independent in usage, but you don't need to bother with that to use them.

In simple practical terms:

CBM = rotating your body "into" the moving leg

CBMP = swinging your moving leg diagonally across your body

Re: Abbreviation query
Posted by Telemark
9/11/2008  11:40:00 PM
Be aware of CBMP, by all means, but don't worry about it.


=

... but you don't need to bother with that to use them.


What do you disagree with?
Re: Abbreviation query
Posted by anymouse
9/12/2008  8:14:00 AM
"What do you disagree with?"

I disagree with the idea presented in what I quoted, which in its entirety was:

"You can't make sense of CBMP until you have got the hang of CBM, because CBMP is"

The disagreement is specifically with this idea that you can only understand CBMP in relation to CBM.

It's false - they are seperate concepts and it's easier to learn what each really means on its own, than to worry about why some dance teachers once, perhaps unwisely, named one in allusion to the other.

CBMP is the moving foot placed diagonally across the body.

CBM is rotating the body into the moving leg.
Re: Abbreviation query
Posted by Telemark
9/12/2008  9:44:00 AM
No, that won't do - it's an inadequate definition of CBMP, and it is important to add the rest:

giving the appearance of CBM having been used, but without turning the body."


I wouldn't advocate anyone getting hangups about understanding concepts that they are not "ready" for, but if you/we/anyone is going to offer an explanation or definition, it should be correct.

I am happy to agree to disagree: I can't see there is anything I can usefully add to my previous posts.

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