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re: Leg Rise vs. Foot Rise
Posted by Jonathan Atkinson
8/9/1999  5:59:00 AM
Yes... as the name implies, leg rise is taken through the legs, which is caused by the straightening action of the knees (under the assumption that they are flexed to begin with).

Foot rise comes from the feet and ankles. The action occurs when one rises onto their toes (assuming that the feet are flat to begin with).

You may also hear of the concept of "body rise", which is, for all intents and purposes, synonymous with leg rise.

When the technique of a step calls for "No Foot Rise" or "Body Rise Only", it means that the rising action should only be taken through the straightening action of the knees, and not by rising up onto one's toes.

I hope this helps.
Sincerely, Jonathan Atkinson

Re: re: Leg Rise vs. Foot Rise
Posted by Don
1/5/2006  5:58:00 AM
It would be a good idea if the question by Kelvin, and the answere by Jonathan be copied and tucked away for future reference. Then when a new person askes the same questions we can all put them on the right path.
Re: Leg Rise vs. Foot Rise
Posted by sin beworld
4/21/2005  6:35:00 PM
no idont maby sommeone else? sorry
Re: Leg Rise vs. Foot Rise
Posted by GEORGIA GORDON
12/31/2005  10:14:00 PM
i boogie
all the time
ilove dancing
so much.
thiers amovie called shall we dance




love Georgia
Re: Leg Rise vs. Foot Rise
Posted by phil.samways
1/1/2006  7:27:00 AM
Jonathan
your answer was perfectly clear
It's a pity that the term "body rise" ever was used at all, since 'foot rise' and 'leg rise' are ideal descriptions. As you know, from a posting i made a little while ago,the concept of 'body rise' worried me for a long time, because i couldn't raise my body without using either foot rise or leg rise (or both of course).
Re: Leg Rise vs. Foot Rise
Posted by Dave
1/3/2006  3:51:00 AM
Phil. To me there is a slight difference between leg rise and body rise. With body rise(stetch) I feel that the floor is pushing my spin up while gravity is pushing everything else down, that is lighter than bone.
Some people will dance leg rise with little stretch of the body or even with a collapsed spine(shoulders pop up) Dave.
Re: Leg Rise vs. Foot Rise
Posted by phil.samways
1/3/2006  4:50:00 AM
I agree there is probably a subtle difference, but when i sat on a chair in my normal dancing posture, i couldn't get any body rise (maybe a teeny bit, which i'm sure nobody would see on the dance floor. I concluded that body rise must be leg rise - maybe leg AND foot rise,come to think of it, whereas foot rise is just foot rise
Re: Leg Rise vs. Foot Rise
Posted by Dave
1/3/2006  6:09:00 AM
Phil. When sitting in a chair you arn't swinging your whole body up against the force of gravity
Re: Leg Rise vs. Foot Rise
Posted by phil.samways
1/3/2006  6:18:00 AM
That would be leg and foot rise.
Re: Leg Rise vs. Foot Rise
Posted by Iluv2Dance
1/3/2006  8:02:00 AM
Hi,
The following brief explanation of Body Rise should prove of assistance in obtaining the correct physical performance of Rise and Fall of the body. This can be divided into three sections. (1) Correct carriage of the body and correct use of the legs. This is known as (1) Muscular Tension. (2) Use of the knees. (3) Use of the feet.
To achieve the correct muscular carriage, do the following. Stand in an erect position with the body muscles braced slightly upwards but not inwards. There should be no chest or shoulder lift. This covers the actual body or torso. To this we add the correct muscular tension of the legs from the feet upwards: Holding the body correctly, Rise on to the balls of both feet - known as Foot Rise. You should now have the feeling of ‘Standing Tall.' Now lower the heels still with that feeling of ‘Standing Tall.' The Use of the Knees: Now, with the body (Torso) and legs being used correctly, Rise and Fall may be achieved by bending and straightening the supporting knee or knees, with, or without, the use of Foot Rise. It could be correctly defined as Body Rise being the feeling of the whole body rising and lowering through the use of the knees. Rise and Fall in the original ballroom technique was covered only by the Footwork. If a step was written as Heel Toe (HT) it meant that the step had a rise. When the technique was re-written to become the ‘Revised Technique' the concept of Body Rise was introduced.

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