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Re: Help on hardwood Dance Floor
Posted by DennisBeach
12/5/2008  2:01:00 PM
The laminate or real wood that clicks/locks together works well and can save you money. They either require installing a padding or have padding attached. I put cheap laminate in a large room in the basement for practising and that works well. I had to level part of the floor to do that, put it worked out well. My only regret is a did not putting better quality laminate in, like I did in 2 rooms upstairs. The good stuff would have been worth the 40% more it cost. But even with the cheap stuff on concrete, we are happy with the results. Any of the click floor are called floating, but probably are not as good as
Re: Useless?
Posted by Guest
11/14/2006  12:42:00 PM
Hate to tell you this but nothing in this world is certain. There is no security in any field that you choose to work in. You can be laid off or fired for a number of reasons ranging from the economy to how much your customer likes the services that you provide. So, you have to choose. People will often tell you to choose something that you like doing so that when you experience hard times, you're willing to endure it.
Re: Andrew Sinkinson
Posted by Guest
11/14/2006  1:18:00 PM
It's always interesting read posts from Anonymous and Don. It's like Albott and Costello. Don, the bending of the knees and not moving forward step that you're trying to describe (you kind of lost me when you started to introduce CBM and CBMP into this issue though), is what they teach us in the very first level of bronze when we know ditully about the waltz. You seem to forget that the hip is also a joint that you can NOT bend if you were to keep your body verticle. What you describe does not create continuity of movement, that's some thing that needs to be present in the waltz and also foxtrot.
Re: Physics of a Step
Posted by Don
11/14/2006  2:26:00 PM
Anonymous. First are you refering to Latin or Standard. I`m guessing it is Standard
You are saying that you move your body forward without leaning. I would say that leaves me still verticle and not imbalanced. So where does your imbalance come into it
Again there is no imbalance .There is in Latin.
Would you also like to repeat one of your former statements that in Standard the body goes ahead of the foot so that we can go to our DVD`s and in slow motion see for ourself.
Re: To Torque or not to Torque
Posted by Don
11/14/2006  2:02:00 PM
Anonymous. You write such garbage its not worth dicussing any more.
Re: To Torque or not to Torque
Posted by Anonymous
11/14/2006  2:06:00 PM
"Anonymous. You write such garbage its not worth dicussing any more."

Pointing out your collasal error in confusing body rotation with body flight is hardly garbage.

But yes, it's clearly not worth discussing anything with someone incapable of learning beyond their present beginner level.
Re: Physics of a Step
Posted by Anonymous
11/14/2006  2:32:00 PM
"I`m guessing it is Standard
You are saying that you move your body forward without leaning. I would say that leaves me still verticle and not imbalanced. So where does your imbalance come into it"

There is imbalance because the body, from the knee up, becomes entirely forward of the standing foot. This means it is not balanced over the only foot bearing weight, which means it is not balanced.

Because the body is vertically aligned from the knee up, no leaning has occured.

You must learn to seperate the idea of leaning (bad) from moving the body weight off of the standing foot while maintaining vertical alignment (good).

Yet once again, I will refer you to frame 2, extension in the learning center forward walk. Although that sequence has some problems overall, frame #2 shows this unbalanced but vertically aligned position that you do not yet understand.

"Would you also like to repeat one of your former statements that in Standard the body goes ahead of the foot so that we can go to our DVD`s and in slow motion see for ourself."

That it does and must is the critical concept you do not yet understand. Again, see the referenced image and you must realize that body forward of the standing foot (and hence off balance) is precisely what has been illustrated.

Can you still not see how this does not involve any leaning?
Re: Useless?
Posted by constance
2/18/2007  3:37:00 PM
Yeah you are right, but life is hard and nothing is ever easy you kind of go hard and try not to look back.
Re: Help on hardwood Dance Floor
Posted by Polished
12/6/2008  2:33:00 AM
What kind of surface do they dance on for the British at Blackpool. It appears to be in squares. What about the floor at Monaco. Is it the same. When watching demonstrations on youtube doesn`t anyone look at the surface being danced on. Square Vinal tiles in many cases. So before spending a fortune on a wooden sprung floor think twice. Is it neccessary.
Re: Help on hardwood Dance Floor
Posted by Telemark
12/6/2008  5:42:00 AM
There are only two properties that govern the quality of a dance floor:

One is the "feel" of the surface. How much grip/resistance is there. It doesn't matter at all what the surface is made of if it has the "right" feel. Well maintained Maple has perfect "feel", but it is very expensive, and is very little used any more.

The other is the "give" in the surface - its spring. A good floor absorbs impact and returns it with reactive force. Traditionally, this is achieved with timber having particular qualities (and this is all about how the boards are supported, and not about the boards themselves), but modern floors are frequently "sprung" with foam or actual leaf springs.

There are aethetic considerations, but these are separate: a proper maple floor, suitably sprung, is a joy to look at as well as to dance on, but much cheaper alternatives can be equally servicable.

Re: Useless?
Posted by anon
2/18/2007  4:12:00 PM
I have worked hard and spent much $ to get my dancing to a certain level. Then my partner decides to have other priorities, so this puts me back to square one since this is not a solitary activity. But, I found another partner, luckily, but I have to pay--the partner is a pro and a perfect match. The partner seems to be stable, reliable and not moving away anytime soon. I know some dancers that refuse to dance amateur due the instability of partners. I am now thinking now how much I can improve with this partner taking 2,3 or 4 lessons a week? I am very fit, athletic, healthy, take great care of myself--with good health how long can this last? Fred Astaire danced until he was in his seventies. Lots of older dancers just stick to International Standard and skip Latin.

I don't want to teach or try to get into the business--it's just a serious hobby that I continue improving at. Partners come and go, but it makes a big difference if you have a good one.
Think I may have lost some interest in dance if this above mentioned partner hadn't come along. You never know--by losing one partner, I picked up a much better one.

I dance mostly for the dancing and the challenge. Sure I make some friends, but not that many since most of the time out dancing you don't talk that much or sometimes don't even catch their names. I definitely have favorite social dancers that work at, take lessons, and are constantly improving.
Re: Physics of a Step
Posted by Anonymous
11/14/2006  2:39:00 PM
It's high time for ASCII Man.

this man is balanced AND vertical AND aligned:

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This man is vertical and aligned but not balanced because he has moved everything from the knee up forward. In other words he is doing exactly what he should when initiating a heel lead.

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This man is vertical and balanced but not aligned - he has lowered WITHOUT moving his center, which is in many cases a fatal mistake:

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Re: To Torque or not to Torque
Posted by Trying to fly
11/15/2006  6:25:00 PM
Anonymous. Exactly what is body flight.
Please explain in simple language.
Re: To Torque or not to Torque
Posted by Anonymous
11/16/2006  7:26:00 AM
"Anonymous. Exactly what is body flight.
Please explain in simple language."

Carrying enough energy of movement in the body that you will, with no further action, drift completely through the step you are currently taking and on into at least one additional step in the same direction.

To avoid taking that additional step, you would need to rise and absorb the energy to a momentary stop (waltz), rise somewhat and redirect in a somewhat new direction (foxtrot), or push against the floor in a braking/checking action.

Unique among the standard dances, tango does not have body flight.
Re: Physics of a Step
Posted by Don
11/14/2006  4:40:00 PM
Anonymous. You have forgotten to bend the knee which will put your shin to an angle of 45 degrees, with your heel to the floor at the same angle 45 degrees.
For those of you who are new to this and wish to make a working model of what is a natural movement.
Get a shopper docket or any simular piece of paper. With the list of purchases facing your left. Fold at about an inch with a crease to the right. About 2 inches above that a crease to left, 2 inches above that a crease to the right. It doesn`t matter what size the peice of paper is. I am using an unopened letter which is probably better than a shopper docket. The top is your body. The bottom are your feet. Hold the body verticle and concertina the whole thing so that the feet are 45 degrees and the shin and the thigh at 45 degrees. Allow the feet to touch down Keeping the body upright. Do you see that the third fold is over the first fold. The front of this model is with the first crease at the bottom to the right.
I am not into Physics but I believe a steel upright which had rusted at those same places as the piece of paper is folded.If it collapsed it would behave the same. Thats why I call it a natural movement.







Re: Physics of a Step
Posted by Anonymous
11/14/2006  9:06:00 PM
"Anonymous. You have forgotten to bend the knee which will put your shin to an angle of 45 degrees"

No, Don. I am bending my knee - remember I said moving the knee and everything above it forward. And I am bending my ankle. But I am bending nothing else - which is at it should be.

Your mistake is to put an extra bend at the waist, so that your knee goes forward while your body stays over your foot. That is simply and plainly WRONG!

Your center must go forward with the knee.

period.
Re: To Torque or not to Torque
Posted by Anon 3
11/16/2006  4:09:00 PM
Anonymous. Now wait a minute, Didn`t you say there was no stop in the Waltz. Now your saying there is. Wouldn`t it have been better to mention sway as a way of channelling the energy into a different direction, which is in this case up and over.
Re: To Torque or not to Torque
Posted by Anonymous
11/16/2006  8:07:00 PM
"Anonymous. Now wait a minute, Didn`t you say there was no stop in the Waltz. Now your saying there is."

No, I have generally said there is no stopping when lowered, apart from lines and checks. When you do waltz rise, the body will largely or even completely stop at the peak of the rise.

"Wouldn`t it have been better to mention sway as a way of channelling the energy into a different direction, which is in this case up and over."

Sway does not channel energy "up", which is the direction it goes in walt. However, sway (or simply not getting quite all the way over your foot) can help you create movement in a new direction - either as you start moving again in the waltz, or as you have slowed somehwat but not stopped on the more moderate rise of a foxtrot action.

But remember, you can do this with a sway shape, or you can do it with your head weight, or you can do it by being a cm or two offset from passing directly over your standing foot - or some combination of all of these. Really all of these boil down to being off balance by that few cm.

And of course a sway shape can also be held in balance over the standing foot - though doing so will not create movement.

It is after all imbalance which is the source of movement...
Re: To Torque or not to Torque
Posted by Anon 3
11/16/2006  8:40:00 PM
Anonymous . What exactly is imbalance to you. How does it operate. I don`t seem to be able to find it in any dance book that I have.
Re: To Torque or not to Torque
Posted by Anonymous
11/17/2006  6:44:00 AM
"Anonymous . What exactly is imbalance to you."

As I have posted several times, any sitution in which the center of mass is not located over or between points of support.

That definition is physical reality - if you are unbalanced with respect to that definition, your body will be accelerating due to the influence of gravity. With careful aim of precisely when and how you enter this imbalance, the resulting "fall" can take you in a wide variety of useful directions - but this cannot contradict the simply physical fact that you are off balance and falling.

Many dance teachers tend to use imprecise "feeling" words which do not reflect physical reality. So for example, if someone says "not anywhere in that sequency did you put me off balance" this is in fact false. What was meant was "not at any point did you put me in a position where gravity forced me to move in a direction or rate in which I didn't agree I should be going"

Gravity is an ally, not an enemy.
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