English
Hello, guest.

Log In or
Register
Return to Forum
39 Messages
Page 1 of 2
Next »
Leg Rise vs. Foot Rise
Posted by Kelvin
8/9/1999  5:58:00 AM
Does any one know the difference between leg rise and foot rise?
re: Leg Rise vs. Foot Rise
Posted by Jonathan Atkinson
8/9/1999  5:59:00 AM
Yes... as the name implies, leg rise is taken through the legs, which is caused by the straightening action of the knees (under the assumption that they are flexed to begin with).

Foot rise comes from the feet and ankles. The action occurs when one rises onto their toes (assuming that the feet are flat to begin with).

You may also hear of the concept of "body rise", which is, for all intents and purposes, synonymous with leg rise.

When the technique of a step calls for "No Foot Rise" or "Body Rise Only", it means that the rising action should only be taken through the straightening action of the knees, and not by rising up onto one's toes.

I hope this helps.
Sincerely, Jonathan Atkinson

Re: re: Leg Rise vs. Foot Rise
Posted by Don
1/5/2006  5:58:00 AM
It would be a good idea if the question by Kelvin, and the answere by Jonathan be copied and tucked away for future reference. Then when a new person askes the same questions we can all put them on the right path.
Re: Leg Rise vs. Foot Rise
Posted by sin beworld
4/21/2005  6:35:00 PM
no idont maby sommeone else? sorry
Re: Leg Rise vs. Foot Rise
Posted by GEORGIA GORDON
12/31/2005  10:14:00 PM
i boogie
all the time
ilove dancing
so much.
thiers amovie called shall we dance




love Georgia
Re: Leg Rise vs. Foot Rise
Posted by phil.samways
1/1/2006  7:27:00 AM
Jonathan
your answer was perfectly clear
It's a pity that the term "body rise" ever was used at all, since 'foot rise' and 'leg rise' are ideal descriptions. As you know, from a posting i made a little while ago,the concept of 'body rise' worried me for a long time, because i couldn't raise my body without using either foot rise or leg rise (or both of course).
Re: Leg Rise vs. Foot Rise
Posted by Dave
1/3/2006  3:51:00 AM
Phil. To me there is a slight difference between leg rise and body rise. With body rise(stetch) I feel that the floor is pushing my spin up while gravity is pushing everything else down, that is lighter than bone.
Some people will dance leg rise with little stretch of the body or even with a collapsed spine(shoulders pop up) Dave.
Re: Leg Rise vs. Foot Rise
Posted by phil.samways
1/3/2006  4:50:00 AM
I agree there is probably a subtle difference, but when i sat on a chair in my normal dancing posture, i couldn't get any body rise (maybe a teeny bit, which i'm sure nobody would see on the dance floor. I concluded that body rise must be leg rise - maybe leg AND foot rise,come to think of it, whereas foot rise is just foot rise
Re: Leg Rise vs. Foot Rise
Posted by Dave
1/3/2006  6:09:00 AM
Phil. When sitting in a chair you arn't swinging your whole body up against the force of gravity
Re: Leg Rise vs. Foot Rise
Posted by phil.samways
1/3/2006  6:18:00 AM
That would be leg and foot rise.
Re: Leg Rise vs. Foot Rise
Posted by Iluv2Dance
1/3/2006  8:02:00 AM
Hi,
The following brief explanation of Body Rise should prove of assistance in obtaining the correct physical performance of Rise and Fall of the body. This can be divided into three sections. (1) Correct carriage of the body and correct use of the legs. This is known as (1) Muscular Tension. (2) Use of the knees. (3) Use of the feet.
To achieve the correct muscular carriage, do the following. Stand in an erect position with the body muscles braced slightly upwards but not inwards. There should be no chest or shoulder lift. This covers the actual body or torso. To this we add the correct muscular tension of the legs from the feet upwards: Holding the body correctly, Rise on to the balls of both feet - known as Foot Rise. You should now have the feeling of ‘Standing Tall.' Now lower the heels still with that feeling of ‘Standing Tall.' The Use of the Knees: Now, with the body (Torso) and legs being used correctly, Rise and Fall may be achieved by bending and straightening the supporting knee or knees, with, or without, the use of Foot Rise. It could be correctly defined as Body Rise being the feeling of the whole body rising and lowering through the use of the knees. Rise and Fall in the original ballroom technique was covered only by the Footwork. If a step was written as Heel Toe (HT) it meant that the step had a rise. When the technique was re-written to become the ‘Revised Technique' the concept of Body Rise was introduced.
Re: Leg Rise vs. Foot Rise
Posted by suomynona
1/3/2006  9:06:00 AM
"Rise and Fall in the original ballroom technique was covered only by the Footwork. If a step was written as Heel Toe (HT) it meant that the step had a rise. When the technique was re-written to become the ‘Revised Technique' the concept of Body Rise was introduced."

This could be a contributing factor to why the specified rise and fall is not exactly the same as the desireable change in body altitude. The revision does not appear to have been complete enough to make the words mean what an inexperienced student would think they should, instead the book remains readable only by those with a knowledge of its language and usage.
Re: Leg Rise vs. Foot Rise
Posted by phil.samways
1/3/2006  9:34:00 AM
THere are very few text books written to cover all levels of expertise (think of Maths text books for 12-15 year olds, and those for university students - they'd be very different). The problem in dancing is that there simply aren't enough students (at all levels)to warrant writing diferent texts for different levels.
Hence, there is no substitute for a good teacher.
Interestingly, there are videos to cover different levels.
I'm philosophising again. you'll have to stop me!
Re: Leg Rise vs. Foot Rise
Posted by Napier
1/22/2008  9:14:00 AM
'Foot rise' is a rise resulting from raising oneself onto the balls of the feet. 'Leg rise' is a result a full or partial straightening of the leg when commencing from a compressed or (bent-leg) position. In theory it is possible to use either type of rise independently or to use both simultaneously, although typically throughout much of ballroom they are used together, which is one of the reasons it is difficult to understand them as separate topics.

As for 'body rise' it is a myth or at least a misnomer! And a nasty one that seems to confuse even many of the highest level professionals. Most teachers of any subject (dance included) are as mad as bloody hatters and think they are doing all sorts of things they aren't when they undertake whatever it is they are trying to teach you and that they AREN'T doing all sorts of things they clearly ARE if you watch them! As a student of anything, one needs to learn to filter the good advice they give you from their years of experience and expert ability from the nonsense they sprout out of tradition or confusion....not that that's always easy but total physical impossibility is always a good clue!!

'Body rise', if you interpret it literally CANNOT exist because, as you will soon notice if you stand in front of a mirror, it is impossible to lengthen the region of your spine from your coccyx to your skull short of lying down for 8 hours sleep (which apparently makes you grow about 1 cm or so, which gravity then robs back off you throughout the day as your spine recompresses), going into zero-gravity for a while (same principal) or perhaps the employment of some sort of medieval torture device such as the rack! The best you will manage, if you try, will be to shrug your shoulders (which is clearly not what is intended). Given the impracticalities of the formerly mentioned techniques during a bar of even the slowest foxtrot, then if you think logically about it, it can't have anything to do with your body or trunk as the name suggests.

Given that you can only rise using your feet or legs then, 'body rise' MUST be the employment of one or the other or both of these or else a complete figment of the imagination, perpetrated by generation after generation of dance instructor.

Alex Moore, in Moore (2005)* describes 'body rise' as a bracing of the leg muscles, in as much as I can gather, which, by no co-incidence, is exactly what ‘leg rise' is!!

Rises termed ‘Body rise', depending on whether taken on a heel turn or on a simple backwards walk must be ‘leg rise' or perhaps on the latter, a combination of ‘foot' and ‘leg rise' and if you examine dancers, this is indeed what they appear to be doing. I know it's what I do and what my teachers actually do, despite the fact that some of them keep insisting I should spontaneously add and retract a few centimetres from my spine as they believe they have the mysterious and magical ability to do. I would pay to see that! Some people may tense the muscles of their trunk or other muscles of their body as some people here have claimed….that's fine…if it works to put you in the right frame of mind, I would say, do it by all means, each to his/her own, but be aware, it won't make your spine any longer!!!!

Thus, ‘body rise' is a redundant term!!!

Q.E.D.

* Moore, A. (2005). Ballroom Dancing. A & C Black Publishers Ltd., London., pp 20-24.
Re: Leg Rise vs. Foot Rise
Posted by terence2
1/22/2008  11:43:00 PM
I think the literal translation of "BR" , can only be translated by the world of mystics !

The term was intended to show, that if the knees are flexed ( which they frequently are ) then the gradual straightening of that apendage should be absorbed in continuity, with the rise designated thru the feet .

Bad explanation = bad results .


But your point is well taken .
Re: Leg Rise vs. Foot Rise
Posted by Serendipidy
1/23/2008  4:40:00 AM
I don`t think to use the words straightening of the legs as correct. Straightening of the knees yes. My legs are straight and dont need straightening. Its the knees that bend and straighten. The rise is through the feet and the knees as well as in the lowering.
Re: Leg Rise vs. Foot Rise
Posted by anymouse
1/23/2008  7:03:00 AM
"'Body rise', if you interpret it literally CANNOT exist because, as you will soon notice if you stand in front of a mirror, it is impossible to lengthen the region of your spine from your coccyx to your skull short of lying down for 8 hours sleep (which apparently makes you grow about 1 cm or so, which gravity then robs back off you throughout the day as your spine recompresses), going into zero-gravity for a while (same principal) or perhaps the employment of some sort of medieval torture device such as the rack! The best you will manage, if you try, will be to shrug your shoulders (which is clearly not what is intended). Given the impracticalities of the formerly mentioned techniques during a bar of even the slowest foxtrot, then if you think logically about it, it can't have anything to do with your body or trunk as the name suggests."

This is not entirely true. Very few people habitually carry their spine aligned for maximum height, and encouraging students in that direction is very common habit of dance teachers.

It is true that the "mind game" effect on presence and performance is greater than they physical increase in height, but the increase in height is not zero.

This even applies, slightly, to body rise as a variable dance element. For example, the middle step of a lady's feather has no foot rise, but a lot of body rise - she need to be as tall as she possibly can be during the phase in which her weight is on her standing heel, because that's a point in time when her partner actually will have foot rise. Most of that is going to be in the leg (hopefully stopping just short of a locked knee), but some of it is going to be in keeping the trunk as aligned, and thus as tall, as humanly possible - and then some.
Re: Leg Rise vs. Foot Rise
Posted by Dave
1/23/2008  7:49:00 AM
Body rise could be thought of the swinging of the body up. There is more to swing than just foot rise and leg rise. There is the power and weight of the swinging foot and the power of the arms and shoulders and the varies muscles of the body that come into play. The body rise(upward flight) of a professional is far greater than that of a novice.
Re: Leg Rise vs. Foot Rise
Posted by Serendipidy
1/23/2008  3:57:00 PM
I will put this on once again. At a lecture by Steven Hillier he said When I rise my body stays down. And when I lower my body stays up. It is all done through the feet ankles and knees.
An excellent excercise to duplicate this to stand by yourself against a door on your toes with the back touching the surface of the door, Lower through the feet ( keeping the heel of one foot from making contact with the floor ) As the heel touches the floor the knees will bend so that the angle between the feet and the knee is 45 degrees and the same between the knee to the hip. Now of course rise with the feet then the knees in that order. A question to ask oneself is what is the angle of the foot from toe to heel in relation to the legs when fully risen. And how many times will the knees bend in three beats of music in the Waltz.
The lady or whoever is going backwards in the Foxtrot. I don`t know what you think but I think with the Sway that is required is all that is needed in the way of body rise to complement the man`s steps and technique.
I would just like to add this. You never know how far you can go in ballroom dancing. The winners yesterday of the Professional Rising Stars Latin at the UK Championships. They were also winners at the German Championship. Five years ago they were doing Rumba Walks around and around this hall every Sunday with the rest of us untill they moved to the UK. I used to get directly behind Julian and Melanie hoping their talent might rub off on me. Keep trying you just never know
Re: Leg Rise vs. Foot Rise
Posted by anymouse
1/23/2008  5:03:00 PM
"I will put this on once again. At a lecture by Steven Hillier he said When I rise my body stays down. And when I lower my body stays up. It is all done through the feet ankles and knees."

On the contrary, the point of that lecture is that it is *not* all done through the feet and legs. There's a determined effort to lengthen the body, especially when lowering in the feet and legs - the actual change may be small, but the intent is important. It's not enough to go to the lecture, you actually have to schedule lessons with these teachers if you want to have a hope of really understanding them.

"As the heel touches the floor the knees will bend so that the angle between the feet and the knee is 45 degrees"

45 degrees might be the right answer for some situations, but it is the WRONG answer for others. Are you ever going to realize that dancing is all about context, or are you just going to go on repeating lecture trivia forever?

"A question to ask oneself is what is the angle of the foot from toe to heel in relation to the legs when fully risen."

For what application? For what dancer? For man or for lady? In what shoes? Context sir, context!
39 Messages
Page 1 of 2
Next »
Copyright © 1997-2014 BallroomDancers.com