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Re: VIENNESE WALTZ
Posted by Polished
10/26/2008  3:27:00 PM
From the Histoty of Ballroom Dancing.
A more sedate form of the V. Waltz was danced at 90 beats per minute, evolved in America about 1834 and was originaly known as the Boston. The Boston has the distinction of being the first Ballroom Dance to be done with the feet parallel rather than turned out in Ballet. The present form of the dance was derived around 1910 in England. Strausse wrote the song The Blue Danube in 1867.
Just for the record the demonstration of the Viennese Waltz I saw in Vienna was a distant cousin to the one I know.
Re: VIENNESE WALTZ
Posted by anymouse
10/27/2008  8:15:00 AM
"A more sedate form of the V. Waltz was danced at 90 beats per minute, evolved in America about 1834 and was originaly known as the Boston."

Some would argue that the Boston is the origin of the modern ballroom slow waltz.
Re: VIENNESE WALTZ
Posted by LondonBallroom
11/13/2013  3:48:00 AM
The reason why both gentleman and lady close in the natural turn but cross in front in the reverse turn is that in the case of the natural turn we are turning towards the open side of the hold but in the case of the reverse turn we are turning towards the closed side*. Although the amount of turn is the same of course, the reverse turn feels "tighter" than the natural turn therefore and this is reflected in the different foot positions.

*In the normal hold, from the gentleman's point of view the left hand side of the hold is described as open even though the body position is closed.

http://www.goballroom.co.uk

Re: VIENNESE WALTZ
Posted by anymouse
11/2/2008  5:15:00 PM
"Although the amount of turn is the same of course, the reverse turn feels "tighter" than the natural turn therefore and this is reflected in the different foot positions."

While the difference in turning in the two directions in the hold should not be discounted, the amount of turn in the most characteristic version is not the same either.

If you are dancing reverse turns down the long side they will have to complete a full 1/2 turn, but if you dance natural turns around the short side each one can be under-turned to add up into a nice graceful arc the width of the room.

Of course some like to curve their reverse turns around the short side, but that's a different story.
Re: VIENNESE WALTZ
Posted by LondonBallroom
11/18/2013  11:37:00 AM
The amount of turn isn't the point, but in case the previous response (from anymouse) causes confusion I'm not sure what is meant by "the most characteristic version" but the amount of turn achieved in the chart forms of the natural and reverse turn is one whole turn for each figure. This is good technique and is the amount of turn expected in examination. Of course the natural turn is underturned at the corner but not "around the short side" or any other side. One could achieve a sort of arc by dancing three naturals in succession, the first and last each cutting a corner. Cutting corners as a matter of course is frowned upon by examiners, however.

http://www.goballroom.co.uk

Re: VIENNESE WALTZ
Posted by Anonymous
11/5/2008  10:40:00 AM
"I'm not sure what is meant by "the most characteristic version" but the amount of turn achieved in the chart forms of the natural and reverse turn is one whole turn for each figure."

The most characteristic execution of Viennese Waltz as a dance would curve around the short side using natural turns which turn less than a half turn.

Therefore, in actual practice the amount of turn commonly used in the natural turn is NOT the same as that used in the reverse turn, but a bit less.

A full half turn natural feels different that the under turned one usually employed.

"Cutting corners as a matter of course is frowned upon"

Going fully into the corners in Viennese waltz does not fit with the flow of the dance which is more naturally oval in shape.
Re: VIENNESE WALTZ
Posted by Polished
11/6/2008  2:21:00 PM
Before you take one step in a V. Waltz make sure you know where you should be facing to start the Natural Turn and the Reverse Turn. The Natural Turn should start facing Diag to Centre.
The Reverse Turn facing the LOD. This is throughout the dance and especially after a forward change.
Re: VIENNESE WALTZ
Posted by LondonBallroom
11/13/2013  3:49:00 AM
In case the previous response (from Polished) causes confusion step 1 of a natural turn is facing line of dance having turned 1/8 to the right between the previous step and step 1. Step 1 of a reverse turn is facing line of dance having turned 1/8 to the left between the previous step and step 1. This is according to the British Dance Council and is the technique also adopted by the Imperial Society of Teachers of Dancing (ISTD) and the United States ISTD.

http://www.goballroom.co.uk

Re: VIENNESE WALTZ
Posted by Polished
11/6/2008  10:23:00 PM
What is not understood about the V, Waltz is. If I don`t start facing diag to centre I will over rotate the Natural Turn. The same with the Reverse. If I started the Reverse facing diag to centre I will over rotate.
Where it sometimes goes wrong is the alignment at the end of the Reverse after the Forward Change. Get that to finish diag to centre and you will be technicaly correct. Try not to do Reverse Turns on the short sides of the Ballroom. If you have to, try not to do heel turns instead of back side together.
Re: VIENNESE WALTZ
Posted by LondonBallroom
11/13/2013  3:50:00 AM
In case the previous response (from Polished) causes confusion the alignment of the last step (step 6) of the reverse turn is facing diagonally to wall. The authority for this is as for my previous message.

http://www.goballroom.co.uk

Re: VIENNESE WALTZ
Posted by Polished
11/7/2008  1:10:00 PM
Where to start or finish a Reverse Turn is facing the LOD. If we decided to do another Reverse we are on the correct line to do so. To go from a Reverse to a Natural our Forward Change should finish diag to centre.
If we were to finish our Reverse and Forward Change facing diag to wall we would be cutting across the LOD. I`m sure other couples might have something to say about that about that.
VIENNESE WALTZ
Posted by DAVID WRIGHT
10/21/2008  3:34:00 AM
I'm curious as to why a 'lock' is danced in the reverse sequence whereas, in the natural sequence of the dance, no lock is performed.

My teacher says "...because that's the way it is". NOT SATISFACTORY!!!
Re: VIENNESE WALTZ
Posted by Russ
10/21/2008  11:26:00 AM
Because we dance around the floor in a counter clockwise direction
Re: VIENNESE WALTZ
Posted by Anonymous
11/7/2008  2:52:00 PM
"Where to start or finish a Reverse Turn is facing the LOD."

No. The correct answer is facing DW, but moving LOD.

The 1/8 turn from DW to LOD is accomplished only during step 1, not before it.

Note that this is a turn of alignment only. The direction of travel is consistently down the LOD while only the alignment really changes.

This kind of changing alignment during step one is rare in the other swing dances (though it does occur), but what must be remembered is that it's only the alignment changing during step one, the travel itself is not curved during step one.
Re: VIENNESE WALTZ
Posted by LondonBallroom
11/13/2013  3:51:00 AM
In case the previous response (from Anonymous) causes confusion the alignment of step 1 of the reverse turn is as I wrote two postings ago.

There are some aspects of technique which are unwritten, however these are few in number and general in kind. These aside, technique is by definition prescribed. There is little room for debate over what is prescribed in ballroom dancing about alignment and amount of turn. One simply has to locate the figure in the technique books, then locate the correct intersection of row and column, and finally read correctly what is written. One may have a subjective opinion as to whether the technique should be rewritten, but not as to what it actually says.

The alignments and amounts of turn are basic and crucial aspects of the Viennese waltz. I encourage readers not to rely on information without authority but to seek qualified tuition.

http://www.goballroom.co.uk

Re: VIENNESE WALTZ
Posted by Anonymous
11/7/2008  5:18:00 PM
"One may have a subjective opinion as to whether the technique should be rewritten, but not as to what it actually says."

You must be new here.

We regularly get into arguments here about what the actual text in the reference books says.

Further, we even more frequently get into arguments about what the literally quoted passages mean.

For example, there's are those here who who still do not understand that the stated amounts of turn are measured between alignments, and that those alignments are of the feet. Neither the body alignment nor the direction of travel will necessarily match the stated foot alignment, or necessarily change when an amount of turn indicates a change of foot alignment.
Re: VIENNESE WALTZ
Posted by Polished
11/7/2008  10:01:00 PM
London Ballroom. Everything you have written is correct except for the exit from the Reverse to the Natural. There after your Forward Change you should be facing diag to centre and not cutting across the LOD on a digonal to the wall alignment. If you did it that way, I take it that you are at the bottom of the long side of the room, you would be heading straight into the corner instead of continuing around the room.
Please don`t anybody ask about the Fleckerl`s.
Re: VIENNESE WALTZ
Posted by LondonBallroom
11/13/2013  3:52:00 AM
"London Ballroom. Everything you have written is correct. . ."

I am happy to help!

". . .except for the exit from the Reverse to the Natural."

Well, I don't think I passed comment on that particular topic. . . !

http://www.goballroom.co.uk
Dude . . .
Posted by jofjonesboro
11/10/2008  8:03:00 AM
posting links to websites that are still being developed is not cool.

jj
Well, genius,
Posted by jofjonesboro
11/10/2008  4:38:00 PM
the next time that you have a technical question you might try telling us up front what kind of operating system you're using.

When I start posting links to non-working websites that I know to be non-working then you can quote scripture.

Yes, that's just what I need. A website full of information about dancing on the other side of the ocean.



jj

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