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Re: Best Ballroom Dancing Songs
Posted by robirahman
4/1/2015  8:24:00 PM
I took some screencaps of my ballroom dance playlists.

http://i.snag.gy/kY40l.jpg

http://i.snag.gy/rOC5L.jpg

I dance mostly American though, so if you see a song labeled rumba or waltz those will be rhythm rumba rather than latin, and smooth waltz rather than standard.
Re: Tango Song Ideas
Posted by goodfoot
4/1/2015  8:50:00 AM
you should definitely do Toxic, I love that song!
Re: Prejudice Against Black Women Dancers? Yes or
Posted by borninusa
3/30/2015  8:01:00 PM
Carol,

I've found that one's personality and approach is far more effective in getting asked to dance than the color of your skin.

I've found the best success to getting asked are:

1) don't be intimidated by being turned down. Just ignore it and move on.
2) smile and be polite
3) be on the floor and close to people who will ask you. Catch them as they are leaving someone else
4) take the lessons and become a good dancer in the dance that is being danced
5) tell your partner you appreciate them and enjoy dancing with them

I hold no bias toward anyone when I look for someone as a partner. I often seek out those who are different and have their own style. I would welcome dancing with someone like you. I can only speak for myself.

These are just the techniques I have found that work.

If you are interested in getting dances rather than proving your perceptions that you are being excluded, you will be successful.

Good luck!
Re: Prejudice Against Black Women Dancers? Yes or
Posted by dannyfeelgood
3/29/2015  9:21:00 AM
cpl of points, the world of salsa (and other styles)does discriminate(Sorry), the politics, various instructors saying their styles are better, even in the same county, town and schools, advanced dancers being clique and not encouraging / dancing with beginners, so sorry for that but now back on topic(no discussion, it happened to me)

men hate the unknown, even dancing with a totally new partner. (also men who are part of cpls would find it very hard to dance with a sgl lady and suffer the wrath of their partner lol) race is just another factor unfortunately. when you go dancing socially are these arranged by the school/classes you go to or run on a regular basis.

even it was a class arrangement, surely the instructor / organizer could make introductions and get you dancing, otherwise can I say I admire ladies who go dancing unescorted, perhaps a local dance or facebook group with sgl dancers in mind might help you partner up.

also it might be that you are a better than the male dancers and they feel intimidated, i know i can dance but I have only been ballroom dancing for a year and would hate for a lady not to get the best of a dance if i wasn't confident

yes you may get passed over but everyone does at some point, i just hope you keep on dancing

as an afterthought, why don't you do a partner search on here or other websites for social dancing (problem solved)
European Tournament for Dancing Students
Posted by i.schooneveld
3/29/2015  4:47:00 AM

Dear ballroom and latin dancers,


Do you love to dance, and share that experience with many other dancers?

You are welcome to join the 54th ETDS in Brno (Czech) 9-12 oct 2015.

For more information go to https://www.facebook.com/events/809625265739610/

Im also asking for your help. Do you know of any student dance association that would like to be invited to this event? please send the name and contact information to i.schooneveld@gmail.com
Re: any advice
Posted by Chad
3/28/2015  9:37:00 PM
Find a new Boyfriend.
Re: Prejudice Against Black Women Dancers? Yes or
Posted by Leanna
3/28/2015  9:16:00 AM
Yes, for sure! I also am a black woman, with extensive ballet training. So, I come from a very racially biased dance works from the start! I was talking with my instructors about the general racist history and prejudices in ballroom, and he agreed wholeheartedly. It's an unfortunate truth. That being said, once I demonstrate my abilities, some of that bias goes away. I have seen that when I wear my hair "natural" vs flat iron it, I also get different responses...
As a psychologist by profession, I find watching behavior fascinating, but try especially hard to break some of those barriers and assumptions. Ballroom is certainly moving more slowly than other social arenas...
Re: IDTA Dance Teachers Salsa Diploma
Posted by Babamm
3/27/2015  6:02:00 AM
Last Weekend I took my ISTD Salsa Associate exams in NY, LA and Cuban Style.
It was the very first session ever Held in Salsa for the ISTD.

I think that the books are great and very detailed which I was looking for. They explain the Music, the instruments, the origin, different styles, alternative Dances like Bachata or Merengue and many more. I recommend them!
They also give some teaching methods.
dance with accelence
Posted by Hopolang
3/26/2015  3:37:00 AM
how wonderful is dancing with more confidence that is the lead to dancing with accelence so be confidend when your to battle in dance compedition by Hopolang Lefosa in Lesotho
Communication and Connection
Posted by Administrator
3/25/2015  9:26:00 AM


The skills involved in leading and following center around principles
of communication. The best leaders are those who communicate their
intentions, while the best followers are those who respond well to
the leader`s intentions. This is facilitated when both leader and
follower do their part to maintain open lines of communication.





At some point or another, we`ve all been frustrated by a poor phone connection. Nothing makes having a conversation more difficult or miserable than when you`re trying to talk over static, interference, and other general interference resulting from a poor connection. It sure makes you appreciate the times when you do have a clear signal!




The lead-and-follow process can be likened to a telephone conversation: The better your connection, the easier it is to have a conversation. So in the coming sections, we will explore some ways to improve your connection, so that you can lead and follow with a solid "4-bar" connection, rather than two tin cans and a string!





What is a Connection?



Definition

A connection is any physical point of contact between two partners in a dance position.







According to this definition, a connection can be any point where you actually
touch your partner. While this is technically correct, it`s not entirely
accurate. Normally, when we think of a connection, we think of a point through
which you lead or follow your partner. So it`s not enough to simply touch your
partner or hold their hand. In order to lead or follow, your connections must do
more. For example:






  • A connection must have TONE.

    In order to function properly as a transmitter of signals, the connected body
    parts should maintain a certain degree of muscle tone. If the connection is
    limp or weak, the lead-and-follow signals will not run through it.


  • A connection must be ACTIVE.

    A working connection is a living, breathing thing. It must be alive, responsive
    to the situation, and ready to transmit and receive signals. In addition to
    being toned, it must also be flexible, and ready to change to accommodate any
    situation.


  • A connection must be MUTUAL.

    It takes two to have a conversation. Both parties must do their part to maintain
    the connection. When one person falls short, the conversation dies, no matter
    how much the other may try to compensate.




Hand Connections
Posted by Administrator
3/25/2015  9:26:00 AM
The Basic One-Hand Connection



To illustrate the basic technique, we will
use a very simple one-hand connection, where the man holds the lady`s right hand in his left, at approximately waist level. Once learned, this technique can be applied to almost any other hand-to-hand connection.






The elbow should be held low, slightly in front of and outward from the hip. The forearm should extend straight forward from the elbow, roughly parallel to the floor. Leader`s palm should be turned upward; follower`s palm turned downward. The connection is sturdy but not heavy, without any squeezing or gripping of the partner`s hand.




There are many reasons why we use this specific positioning of the arms and hands. Most importantly:




1. The point directly between each partner`s center of balance is the point of maximum leverage. Placing the hand connection in this area improves the partners` sensitivity to each others` movement.




2. At waist level (or slightly above), the forearm is roughly parallel to the floor. Both forearms are aimed directly into one another, so that the pressure moves straight down the middle of the connection, without deflecting out to an angle.



Let`s take a closer look:















STRONG: Pressure directed toward or away the middle of the connection.

WEAK. Pressure deflected off to an angle.





Hand Positioning



In the basic one-hand connection, the man`s hand is extended with the palm turned upward, while the lady`s hand extends with the palm turned downward. Both hands should be very lightly cupped, with the fingers held together (not spread apart).





Tips




  • Don`t grab or squeeze your partner`s hand. Not only are your fingers very poor transmitters of lead and follow signals, they`re actually distractions. The more you squeeze, the more you muddy up the connection, and the more difficult it is to communicate with your partner. Besides, it hurts!


  • For similar reasons, don`t press down on your partner`s hand with your thumb.


  • Don`t spread the fingers apart, or stick them out in various directions. The thumb can be held loosely apart from the fingers, but the fingers themselves should stick together, as though you were wearing mittens.


  • Keep the hand loosely cupped. This creates just enough friction to hold the connection together when tension is applied through push or pull, without the need for a grasp. Don`t allow your hand to flatten-out completely, as it may cause you to slip and lose the connection with your partner.

The Concept of Push and Pull
Posted by Administrator
3/25/2015  9:26:00 AM

Definition

Push & Pull: Tension applied to a connection through the direction of body weight toward it (Push) or away from it (Pull).





Do not be fooled by the slightly misleading terms... Push and pull have very little
to do with an actual pushing or pulling action of the hands and arms. As the
definition suggests, the concept of Push & Pull center around the direction
of body weight, either toward or away from a connection.

















Push
Pull

When both partners shift the body weight towards each other at the same time, the result is a tension which creates a "pushing" sensation through the connection.

When both partners shift the body weight away from each other at the same time, the result is a tension which creates a "pulling" sensation through the connection.





Push



To achieve the feeling of "push", you and your partner should shift your weight
towards each other to the point that you can feel each other`s body weight
working into the connection. This will create a natural tension through the
connected hands.



PITFALLS...





  • Be careful with your interpretation of "shifting weight forward". It should not be necessary to literally pitch your body forward. A good weight connection can be established almost invisibly, without any change in your posture.




  • Don`t allow the elbows to compress backwards behind the hips as push is applied to them. Make sure that you have enough tone in the muscles to maintain the position of the arms and hands.




  • The hands and arms should use enough muscle tone to maintain their position, but not so much that they actually push on their own. Whenever hands and arms try to act on their own, they stop transmitting signals which are being sent by the body, and the true communication gets interrupted. It`s very easy to fool yourself into thinking you have a weight connection, when in fact you and your partner are really just superficially tugging at each others` limbs.







Pull



To achieve the feeling of "pull", you and your partner should shift your weight away from each other to the point that you can feel each other`s body weight working away from the connection. This will create a natural tension through the connected hands.



PITFALLS...




  • Once again, don`t confuse "shifting weight backwards" with literally pitching or slouching backwards. A pull connection only requires a subtle shifting of weight backwards, without any change of posture.




  • Don`t allow the elbows to extend or straighten as pull is applied to them. Make sure that you have enough tone in the muscles to maintain the bent position of the elbows.




  • At the same time, remember not to use too much tension. The most common symptom of overuse of arm muscles when pulling is the contracting of the elbows towards the body.








Reminder


Don`t forget that connection is mutual! Push or pull therefore require both partners to be shifting their body weight toward or away from each other at the same time. It just doesn`t work when one partner shifts weight toward while the other shifts away. Part of the skill of following therefore involves the reaction on the part of the follower to the leader`s suggestions of push and pull. Exercises later in this lesson will focus on developing this skill.


Leading Directional Movements
Posted by Administrator
3/25/2015  9:26:00 AM


In a closed position dance hold, leading directional movement is a relatively simple process: Since the partners` bodies are directly connected, the leader simply moves in a direction, and
the follower should automatically respond with equal movement.




In open position, the mobility of the arms adds a layer of complexity and variability. But it can be simplified as long as (1) the arms remain still, and (2) before moving in a direction, you establish a weight connection, first.













Step 1: Connect body weight using a body weight connection -- either push or pull.

Step 2: Move body weight in a direction. No physical pushing or pulling is necessary.






The tension applied to a connection gives the leader a means by which he can communicate the direction of his movement. Once either push or pull has been established, the connection has been effectively "switched on", and the leading or following of directional movement can begin. With the tension in place, the leader does not need to do any additional pushing or pulling through the arms; He only needs to move his body in one direction or another. The follower will automatically feel and respond to his movement through the active connection.






As illustrated by this incredibly complicated looking flowchart, the connection is first established, and then the body moves. The connection can then be maintained or released. If the weight connection is released, another connection can be established in a new direction.



Push Backwards, Pull Forward



Rule of Thumb

Push is most often used to lead the follower to step backwards, while pull is used to lead the follower forward.





In theory, any direction of movement can be led with either a push or a pull connection. There are many instances where you may wish to simply establish a connection such as push, and maintain it throughout a series of movements with many directional changes. Again, this is possible because once the connection is established, the follower can feel the leader`s movement in any direction. But in general, we will be discussing push as a method of leading the follower to step backwards, and pull as a method of leading the follower forward.



Perspective: Leader



Your job as the leader is to clearly communicate your intentions. The best way to do this is to move your body from one foot to another, in a clear direction. The more you attempt to manipulate the follower`s movement by pushing or pulling her with your hands and arms, the more superficial and less effective your lead becomes. In fact, it`s best not to think of leading your partner at all. Instead, simply lead yourself. With the right connection, your partner will have no choice but to follow.



Perspective: Follower



Tip

Following is reaction. In order for a reaction to take place, there must first be an action. If you react before your partner acts, you`re not really reacting at all... you`re second-guessing. And unless you`re a psychic, your predictions will not always pan out.





As the follower, your job is to produce an equal and opposite reaction. If the leader pushes, you push. If the leader pulls, you pull. If the leader moves, you move. Always respond to an action in kind.




But while this may seem logical enough, it`s surprising how many followers don`t quite get it right. The most common mistake is to react to the feeling of push by taking a back step, or to react to the feeling of pull by taking a forward step. Remember, the leader`s invitation to push or pull is not an indication of where to move. It is merely an attempt to establish a weight connection toward or away from each other.




So when you feel the leader`s weight shifting toward you, you should shift your weight towards him. Don`t actually take a step. Before you can take a step, the following conditions must be met:




  • 1. You`ve both shifted towards or away from each other, and you can clearly feel each other`s body weight.

  • 2. Through this weight connection, you actually feel him take a step.




To take a step before you establish the weight connection is to second-guess the leader`s intentions, which you now know is ineffective and error-prone.

Leading Oppositional Movements
Posted by Administrator
3/25/2015  9:26:00 AM


Oppositional movement occurs when two partners move in opposite directions, such as they do during a Rock Step in East Coast Swing or Jive.













Step 1: Extablish a weight connection.

Step 2: Gently push away by icreasing tone in arms, them move in opposite directions.






The technique for leading of oppositional movement is slightly different than that of leading basic directional movement, where partners move in the same direction. In order to lead oppositional movement, a slight and momentary push or pull "impulse" from the arms and hands is necessary. Otherwise, the follower would move in the same direction as the leader. Still, the pushing or pulling impulse of the arms and hands is not a substitute for the weight connection altogether. The weight connection must still happen before the impulse.





Use of Arms



When used properly, the arms and hands can aid in leading oppositional movement. But what exactly is "proper" use of arms and hands? What makes the use of arms an aid, as opposed to a distraction? Here are a few hints:




  • The weight connection must still be established, first.

  • The impulse should be a subtle action, not a strong yank or shove.

  • Instead of pushing the connection away from your body, push your body away from
    the connection. This is important enough to repeat, so here goes...




Tip

Instead of pushing the connection away from your body, push your body away from the connection.





This may seem logical, but it`s surprising how many followers don`t quite get it right. The most common mistake is to react to the feeling of push by taking a back step, or to react to the feeling of pull by taking a forward step. Remember, the leader`s invitation to push or pull is not an indication of where to move. It is merely an attempt to establish a weight connection toward or away from each other.




So when you feel the leader`s weight shifting toward you, you should shift your weight towards him. Don`t actually take a step. Before you can take a step, the following conditions must be met:




  • You`ve both shifted towards or away from each other, and you can clearly feel
    each other`s body weight.

  • Through this weight connection, you actually feel him take a step.




To take a step before you establish the weight connection is to second-guess the leader`s intentions, which you now know is an ineffective and error-prone method.




Think of the connection as a fixed point in space. In order to step back, push your body away from the connection. Leaders -- this applies to you, too! You do not need to literally push your partner backwards. The follower will respond to the impulse resulting when you push your own weight backwards.

Exercise 1: Stationary Push and Pull
Posted by Administrator
3/25/2015  9:26:00 AM



Stand facing your partner with a two-hand connection. This exercise is to be done while standing in place, so stand in a sturdy position with feet apart at approximately shoulders` distance. Do not move your feet at any point during the exercise.




Elbows should be held low, slightly in front of and outward from the hips. The forearms should extend straight forward from the elbows, roughly parallel to the floor. Leader`s palms should be turned upward; followers palms turned downward. The connection is sturdy but not heavy, without any squeezing or gripping of the partner`s hands.



1. Push



Establish a push connection. To achieve the
feeling of push, you and your partner should shift your weight towards each other to the point that you can feel each other`s body weight working forward through the connection. Keep the connection consistent, and hold it for a few seconds.



2. Pull



Establish a pull connection. To achieve the feeling of pull, you and your partner should shift your weight away from each other to the point that you can feel each other`s body weight working away from the connection. Keep the connection consistent, and hold it for a few seconds.



3. Repeat



Switch back and forth between a push connection and a pull connection, holding each connection for approximately 3 seconds. Be consistent and predictable with your intervals. Don`t switch back and forth quickly. If you prefer to use music, hold each connection for 1 full measure (4 beats) before switching.




Remember to maintain the position of the
arms so that the elbows don`t compress backwards behind the body, or extend or straighten too far in front. Don`t lean or pitch your body forward or backwards, and don`t use the arms to shove or tug your partner.



Lead & Follow



The leader should now call the shots. Begin again in an open facing position with a two-hand hold, but without any weight connection. When ready, the leader will try to establish a connection, and the follower must reciprocate. The leader may now make decisions about when and how quickly to change the connection from push to pull (or vice-versa), and it is up to the follower to feel the changes and respond.




LEADER: Don`t be too predictable with your changes. To ensure that your partner is really following you, change the connection at very inconsistent intervals. Sometimes change the connections quickly; other times hold the connection for many seconds before changing. If your partner is having difficulty following, slow down and wait for the correct response before changing the connection again.




FOLLOWER: Your job is to pay close attention to the direction of your partner`s weight, and then reciprocate. If you feel your partner`s weight coming toward you, don`t back up... shift your weight forward in order to counterbalance. Likewise, if you feel your partner`s weight shifting away, don`t follow by moving toward him... shift your weight backwards in order to counterbalance.



More Ideas



After you`ve become comfortable with this exercise using a two-hand hold, try it again with only a one-hand hold. The most important one-hand connection to practice is the basic RH-LH connection, but you can also practice using other connections such as LH-RH, or handshake hold (RH-RH or LH-LH).




It`s also a good idea to switch roles, so that the leader learns how to follow and the follower learns how to lead. You can learn a lot more about your own part by looking at it from the perspective of your partner.

Exercise 2: Directional Movement
Posted by Administrator
3/25/2015  9:26:00 AM



Stand facing your partner with a one-hand connection.




The elbows should be held low, slightly in front of and outward from the hips. The forearms should extend straight forward from the elbows, roughly parallel to the floor. Leader`s palm should be turned upward; followers palm turned downward. The connection is sturdy but not heavy, without any squeezing or gripping of the partner`s hand.



1. Push



Establish a push connection by shifting your weight towards each other to the point that you can feel each other`s body weight working forward through the connection. Maintain this connection. Do not let it go, and do not switch to pull.



2. Move The Body



After you are fully satisfied that the connection is established, you can start to move. The leader should instigate the movement with a forward step. The follower will hopefully react with a step back.




To make matters simple, let`s predetermine that the leader will take his first step forward with the left foot, while the follower will step back with the right. (This is not an absolute for all situations, but a good starting point for this exercise.)




Tip

Leaders: In order to be effective with your lead, you must fully shift your weight from one foot to another. After all, it`s not the movement of your foot that the follower reacts to... it`s the movement of your body weight.




3. Stop



After taking a total of 3 steps, stop moving, with the leader`s weight forward on the left foot, and follower`s weight back on the right. You can now release the push connection.



4. Pull



Establish a pull connection by shifting your weight away from each other to the point that you can feel each other`s body weight working away from the connection. Maintain this connection. Do not let it go, and do not switch to push.



5. Move The Body



After you are fully satisfied that the connection is established, you can start to move. The leader should instigate the movement with a step back on the right foot. The follower will hopefully react with a step forward on the left.



6. Stop



After taking a total of 3 steps, stop moving, with the leader`s weight back on the right foot, and follower`s weight forward on the left. You can now release the pull connection and begin again.



Lather, Rinse, Repeat



And repeat. And repeat. This is an excellent exercise for connection training. The more you practice it, the better you`ll get. As you get better, you can add difficulty to the exercise in the following ways:





  • Instead of predetermining that you will
    take exactly 3 steps in each direction, allow the leader to determine how many (or few) steps to take. You can even shift the weight forward and back over one step, which is essentially a rock step. But remember, the connection must always be present before the movement can occur.


  • The leader can change the rhythm of the
    steps, and the follower must use the weight connection to feel and react to the rhythm. You may use a predetermined rhythm, or if you`re really good, you can improvise.


  • Add side steps to the mix. Side steps can be lead with either a push or a pull connection, so you don`t even need to change the connection to lead the sideways movement. Try it!

Exercise 3: Swing Basic
Posted by Administrator
3/25/2015  9:26:00 AM


In the previous exercise, you learned how to lead and follow basic progressive
movements through the use of a weight connection. This exercise will now give
you some practice with leading and following both lateral and
oppositional movements. The EC Swing (or Jive) basic lends itself well
for this exercise, since it contains both of these elements.




If you aren`t already familiar with the EC Swing Basic or the Jive fallaway Rock, your first
assignment is to learn it. Use the video clip, or examine the technical breakdown of the components here:




EC Swing Basic


Jive Fallaway Rock









































Step # Timing Man`s Part Lady`s Part
Begin

Open facing position, one- or two-hand hold.

1-3
1a2
Triple step sideways, LRL.
Triple step sideways, RLR.
4-6
3a4
Triple step sideways, RLR.
Triple step sideways, LRL.
7
5
Left foot back, away from partner.
Right foot back, away from partner.
8
6
Replace weight to right foot.
Replace weight to left foot




Tip

Some people like to begin Swing with the triple step as shown above. Others prefer to
begin with the rock step. After you learn this exercise, your leading and following skills should be such that there will be no need to predetermine the starting point... it can be decided by the leader on the spur of the moment!






Incorporating the Weight Connection



You now know that a weight connection must be established (or maintained) prior to leading a movement. You also know of oppositional movement that a slight "impulse" from the hands and arms is also required. Based on this knowledge, we can now append our breakdown of the EC Swing Basic Step to include lead-and-follow elements, like so:








































































Step # Timing Man`s Part Lady`s Part
Begin
Open facing position, one- or two-hand hold.
Prep
a
Establish a light PUSH connection.
Establish a light PUSH connection.
1-3
1a2
Triple step sideways, LRL.
Triple step sideways, RLR.
a
Maintain PUSH connection.
Maintain PUSH connection.
4-6
3a4
Triple step sideways, RLR. Increase PUSH connection on 6.
Triple step sideways, LRL. Increase PUSH connection on 6.
a
PUSH impulse through arms and hands.
PUSH impulse through arms and hands.
7
5
Left foot back, away from partner*. Establish a PULL
connection.
Right foot back, away from partner*. Establish a PULL
connection.
a
PULL impulse through arms and hands.
PULL impulse through arms and hands.
8
6
Replace weight to right foot, towards partner*.
Replace weight to left foot, towards partner*.
a
Establish a light PUSH connection
Establish a light PUSH connection.




* On steps 5-6, remember to move your body towards and away from the connection; not the connection towards or away from your body.





The Exercise



Go slowly and meticulously through the sequence of actions as described above, stopping each point along the way to check your connection before moving on to the next. Take your time! This is not a race... If you move through the actions too quickly, you may unwittingly miss certain connections, and you would be training yourself incorrectly. As you improve, you can very gradually increase the speed.



Review
Posted by Administrator
3/25/2015  9:26:00 AM


Successful leading and following comes from effective communication, which is dependent upon a good connection, no matter what the dance position. When in open position, the hand connection is the only means by which a signal can be transferred from leader to follower, and so this connection must be constantly maintained in a position which facilitates the transfer of signals.




With a one- or two-hand connection, the elbows should be held slightly in front of and outward from the hips, with the forearms extending straight forward from the elbows, parallel to the floor. The arms should be able to withstand push and pull pressure in order to maintain their position, so that they do not extend too far away from the body or collapse inward towards the body. The hands should be loosely cupped, without any squeezing or gripping of the partner`s hands.




There are two types of weight connection: Push, and pull. These terms do not describe actions of the arms and hands, but rather the sensation felt when the body weight is directed towards or away from a connection. Push and pull connections should be almost invisible to the onlooker, with no change in posture or arm positioning.




In order to lead directional movement, a weight connection must first be established. Once the weight connection has been established, the leader can lead the follower simply through the movement of his own body. No additional pushing or pulling or the arms is necessary. In general, backwards steps are led with a push connection, forward steps are led with a pull connection, and side steps are led with either push or pull.




Oppositional movement requires an additional push or pull impulse through the arms and hands, but this impulse should be subtle and invisible, and should not take place without first establishing a weight connection. One should always think of pushing themselves away from the connection, not the connection away from themselves.

Leading and Following in Open Positions
Posted by Administrator
3/25/2015  9:24:00 AM


In this lesson, we will teach you what it means to have a good connection with
your partner, so that you can communicate with each other in the most effective
possible way. First, we will discuss the concept of connection, and explain why
it`s so important. Then we`ll illustrate some techniques for improving your connection,
such as hand positioning, tone, leverage, and the use of body weight. This may sound
complicated, but the techniques are quite simple, and will do wonders for your
leading and/or following skills.





[toc]

Does your Child Like Moving to Music?
Posted by wingstowings
3/25/2015  12:49:00 AM
Dear Mummies/Daddies,

We are a dance school located very centrally, in Raffles Place.

Our genres include ballet, jazz, ballroom, hip hop and dance fitness (Zumba, yoga etc.)

We cater both children and adult classes. Feel free to join us for a trial class.

Check us out on wingstowings.com, or give us a call at 65320406.

We are holding an Easter dance workshop with games and crafts on 5th April 2015 at only $25.

Cheers,
Wings to Wings
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