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+ View Older Messages

Re: The injuries are mounting
Posted by terence2
5/10/2009  10:58:00 PM
My " parts " became indpendant yrs ago !!!

Seriously.. I know hundreds of my fellow pro,s who do nothing but teach and dance, and never seem to be bothered by the normal aches and pains that come with age. There,s a gentleman in a nearby town who is in his mid 80s, still teaching 5 days a week..I believe it has a lot to do with lifestyle ( I dont smoke nor drink )..I do walk to my studio, and to the local store .

I,m not advocating DONT stretch.. just making a point that we are all somewhat different .
Re: The injuries are mounting
Posted by phil.samways
5/12/2009  8:10:00 AM
Well, i'm a bit of a wrinkly myself, but am very lucky with most of my joints. My main points would be
1)Warm up gently for 5 minutes at least before dancing to establish good blood flow. This is much more important than stretching. Stretching should be done after exercise
2)Keep exercising. I read recently that when jogging with arthritis, as long as you can keep proper 'form' (i.e. don't start favouring one side) the benefit of the exercise outweighs any slight damage being done.
3) Go to the gym to do general strength work, and keep flexible by doing flexibility work. What i really mean i guess is keep in good shape outside of the dancing.
4) Glucosamine sulphate has been shown to improve joint spaces in the knee. DEfinitely take 1000mg per day .It often comes with chondroitin
5) recent research has shown that for older people, a protein supplement taken within half an hour of exercise will speed up repair of minor tissue damage. Get some protein bars from the health shop.
6) Remember that the knee joint is essentially held together by your quad muscles and it's essential to keep those strong to prevent excessive joint movement. It is possible to exercise these well without bending the knee, and so avoiding any damage.
7) you'd service your car regularly, so do the same with the body. Don't neglect anything.

This doesn't help anyone, but there's a lot of heredity involved in these things. Also, it has been shown that those who have exercised all their life (well, nearly all their life, but you know what i mean) may have more joint damage, but cope with it much better than others.
Re: The injuries are mounting
Posted by Iluv2Dance
5/12/2009  11:54:00 PM
Excellent advice, Phil.
Re: The injuries are mounting
Posted by dentalv6
5/13/2009  8:00:00 AM
We have the same programme here in Scandinavia. The celebrities are pushing themselves much to far. Some of them start totally out of shape and train 6 days a week for 4 or 5 hours.
I'm a runner, and no beginner's running programme recommends training with 10k every day in order to run a half marathon in 2 months.
I do a bit of ballroom in the wintertime and I think people tend to forget that dancing is a sport and the same rules apply as to any other sport, which is warm ups, gradually working up stamina and strength, having days off between and listening to you body's signals, tretching.
It's depressing to be laid off due to an injury especially if it's something one enjoys.
And by the way running and dancing is a very good combination - so dancers: Take op running to, and get some fresh air!
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